In advertising, we trust.

In recent surveys, it turns out that 61% of Americans trust the advertising they see, and 72% view all advertising as honest.  A 16% jump from the last two years.  Meanwhile, only 32% of Americans trust the news.  The NEWS.

*sources:  Gallup, Axios

What does this mean?

Below are my predictions:

  • Media costs will skyrocket, again.
  • PR will be less effective.
  • Video ads will be the big winner.
  • Promoted content on news sites just lost ALL ITS VALUE.
  • Impressions mean something.  Remember the poll was about advertising they “see”.  The messages are getting through and they are deemed as truth.
  • Real-time metrics will become less meaningful.  Clicks this hour will not represent attention or trust.  They’ll be a reversal of economic impact measurement while the market works out the buying cycle to trust.

The advice:

  • Saddle up with emotionally connected, honest campaigns.  Really invest in high production quality.  Try hiring a consultant who can pull together a Cadillac crowd-source of talent.
  • Choose disruptive platforms.  Streaming shows with uninterrupted commercial time is a good bet.  Re-marketing pixels that deliver believable benefits on a repetition.
  • Double down on media spend.  Media buys should be your number one priority of the moment.  Shift budget from sources that are viewed as untrusted.
  • For the love of Pete, hire a media strategist that has been in the trenches longer than Facebook.  With this type of opportunity on the line, you should not be taking risks.  Just because someone knows how to push the buttons for your media campaign, does not mean they know “why” someone will or won’t respond.
  • Strategy and measurement will be very important.  Hire an agnostic party who is a media veteran and can guide and measure the process in a more modern way than web traffic, clicks and shares.

Good luck, it’s about to get real crazy out there for advertisers.  As always, if assistance is needed, give me a shout.

~~~~~~~

Jennifer Barbee is a 22 year media veteran and advertising futurist.  She’s been named a Female Entrepreneur of the Year in Advertising & Media by the Stevie Awards and a Top 20 Mom in Business by StartUp Nation.

The Revolution will not be Televised.

Five years ago, the technology of today seemed like science fiction. In the late 90s and early 2000s, when I was young and attempting to sell websites to businesses, I received a barrage of negativity that the web was “just a phase”. As recent as 2008, an executive told me, “I don’t understand people who spend 10-15 hours a week on the Internet, but then again, I don’t understand pedophiles.” What the WHAT?!? Did this man just discount the web and call me a pedo in one breath?!? I should tell you he went on to be one of my biggest fans and wrote one of the most compelling, sweetest reference letters of my career. He just needed patience and empirical data to shift his perspective. I was happy to provide.

Let me now spill the tea. What you think you know about the next 5 or 10 years in communication and advertising is completely wrong. Dead wrong. Even futurists are conservative in their prognostications, in my opinion.

Smartphones have reached the masses, this means the trends are about to shift. Already, the desktop is an accessory to the smartphone. The iOT (Internet  of Things) is rarely understood, but already plaguing our daily lives.  I interviewed 37 destinations and businesses over the summer of 2016, and NOT ONE had plans to use iOT as a marketing channel.

Augmented Reality (AR) seems a kitchy buzzword to many, reserved for the “geeks” who play Pokemon Go.  BIG MISTAKE.  HUGE.

Before you can steer your marketing spend in the next direction, consumers will already have adopted AR in a natural habitat.  The world, with a lens of information.

The future is deviceless.  And, it’s not 20 years away.

You meet someone for the first time and AR delivers their social profiles and cv to explore.  You stand outside a restaurant and can view a layer of customer reviews, menu and daily specials.

The next (near term) phase of technology and communications will come on so naturally, smartphones will be viewed like the 80s brick cells. And, you won’t be ready because you are still catching up on digital marketing that you began too slow.

I’m not even going to get into the “robots” and AI (artificial intelligence/machine learning) that has already become so standard, you might not even recognize it’s all around you.

Here’s some brutal truth you need to hear:  Your search strategy is shit.  Your social media marketing is mediocre, at best.  And, you are going to miss the boat of another tectonic shift in communication because of fear.

Imagine if Destination Marketing Organizations had understood and heavily invested in websites/Internet in the 1990s.  There would be no OTAs, DMOs would enjoy, not only market capitalization, but booking fees to fund their smart city.  Instead, DMOs are behind the market, fighting for bed tax not collected  by the OTA d’jour.

I implore you, to look at shifting strategy NOW before technology out paces your media plan.

As always, I’m available for counsel with my fellow rebels with a cause.

Yours in tech solidarity,

Jenn

The Need for Destinations to Invest in Local Businesses Now

Traditionally, DMOs have helped local businesses market to tourists in a myriad of ways:  co-op campaigns, premium exposure on DMO owned media, ads and listings in travel guides and sales missions.  The “trickle-down” marketing strategy has run it’s course.

With self-run, low cost digital promotional opportunities, the small local restaurant has just as much of a chance of over-booking travelers and capturing brand attention as, well, the destination itself.

The problem is, by relying heavily on advertising and marketing service agencies, most DMOs don’t have the capacity, the trade secrets or the incentive to properly train local businesses.  This is unfortunate, and leaves local businesses to rely on their own budget to market, often with costly mistakes.  Even with self-published media sites like Facebook and Google, a lot of ad budget can be wasted if the nuances of closed loop marketing, remarketing and drip marketing are not fired or understood.

I’ve spent a career (hell, almost a lifetime) of 20 years educating, innovating and leading DMOs to their digital success.  In that time, I’ve been fortunate enough to gain access to practices and tools that are not widely talked about outside the halls of global media firms.  At that, very few marketing service firms for destinations employ many, if any of them. I desperately want to shout to the DMO community what a disservice they could be doing to themselves…and if you’ve heard me speak – you know I do!jenn_speaking

I fully realize after working with over 400 DMOs and their stakeholders, that the most effective way to gain a competitive edge for their destination is to make each and every one of their local businesses an absolute powerhouse of digital marketing.  Teaching those businesses how to *actually* connect ROI to earned media, how to pitch and land media exposure every time and the trade secrets to sponsored media opportunities that yield 300x return will give your travel marketing a boost so significant, your board won’t believe it.

Imagine your city/region/state with dozens or hundreds of self-contained digital marketing media shops.  Instead of a stakeholder complaint about a listing or co-op media, imagine the praise lauded by a business owner whose profits have doubled due to the training gained.  Sound too good to be true?  Let’s talk about Destination Amp Camp.

Sh*t to Quit in 2017

Sorry I haven’t posted in a while.  I’m helping clients launch some very exciting businesses and working on a new program to help women step into their executive power.  Good stuff to come!  Now, here’s what’s on my mind today…

While everyone is making 2017 resolutions, let me remind you of something.  Time and the calendar is a human construct.

Every day is an opportunity for resolution and growth.

I probably know more about growth than I publicly want to admit.  I’ve been as low as possible and I’ve been a millionaire using only $40 to get started.  I  know a little about facing the broken version of yourself in the mirror and still doing what needs to be done to feed the children.  What I know most is that quitting bullshit that does not serve you is as important, if not paramount, to reaching your goals, personal and professional.  Stop reading that crappy book, walk away from the relationship that makes you feel less than, quit the job that goes nowhere.

 Make space for the inspired, the divine, the fated.

If you must plan for the magical New Year, plan on quitting the bullshit.  Here, let me help.

  1.  Stop calling yourself a Mompreneur.

It classifies you as less than an entrepreneur.  Either you are a boss or you’re not.  Playing the woman card means you can’t hack it in the “regular Olympics”.  You are enough.  Your vision is enough.  Own it.

2.  Quit putting unrealistic time constraints on things.

No, none of us know how much time we have.  And, it’s usually shorter than we want or deserve.  But, do you want to linger around years after you made your unrealistic goals – only to reflect on the relationships you neglected to make those goals?  Or, do you want to die with purpose on your breath?  Just start.  Do the thing, it will take on a life of it’s own.  Maybe that’s a year, maybe that’s a decade.  Enjoy every fu*&ing minute of this life and quit putting ungodly restraints on yourself.  Have some goals, abso-freaking-lutely.  But, let them do their thing as you make beast moves to realize them.

3.  Quit settling.

If you *do* want to reach your goals quickly, may I suggest you quit settling for less than you deserve?  Want a better car? Get disgusted by the one you have.  Want a better lifestyle?  Don’t tighten your belt, raise your damn standards.  Raising your standards and refusing to be anything but the vision of yourself you want is a real quick way to get what you want on a fast track.  Would that ideal version of you do what you are doing?  No?   Then cut that shit out.

4.  Stop seeing the best in people.

I try to live a positive life and appreciate everyone for their unique gifts.  I love each and every person I know.  That does not mean I give them credit for qualities they do not have.  I’m THANKFUL when people are not as capable, nice, trustworthy, etc as I would expect.  It GROWS ME, it causes me to find fulfillment in what I give myself, not what someone else can provide

5.  Quit buying “get rich quick” books and program schemes.

You know how those authors got rich quick?  They sold you on their system.  Garbage.  Yeah, the guy at the top is rich, you sucker.  If getting rich is your goal: find a problem, fix it. (^^,)  There, I saved you $299.99

 

Just my own meandering advice.  Love and light to you all!  Love yourselves enough to quit the crap and embrace self-development.

B2B lead warming process in 5 foolproof (but not so easy) steps.

The Holy Grail of content marketing is securing B2B lead marketing permission.  The Rule of 7 is often touted, I’m presenting you with the Rule of 5.  Quicker, easier and infinitely more manageable.

So, you’re gathering emails in hopes of snatching a service sale.  Do you *really* think downloading your white paper means they ‘re ready for  used car pitch?  Nope nope nope.  C’mon.  Did you ask your significant other to marry you on date one?  And, actually – providing your email address for gated content isn’t even date one.  It’s a glance across the room.  You have a lot more work to do, buster.  Thankfully, I’ve done a lot of that hard work for you.  And, while Mamma taught me not to give away the milk for free, I know the real strategy and hard work is in the execution of these steps.  So, I’m quite happy to give you a leg up in your B2B strategy in exchange for your subscription to my blog. (READ:  SUBSCRIBE HERE NOW)

The key to B2B lead nurturing in your outbound communication is service without expectation.

If at any time during these steps, the prospective company happens to be in search of a service you provide, you’ll already be top of mind.  No need for a barrage of hard sale.

You get the gist.  These steps will keep your prospect locked with interest.  They’re at a big party and (if done correctly) you’ll remain the pretty girl in the corner they want to approach.

These steps are nicknamed “The Drip”, “The Funnel”, “The WarmUp”.  Heck, you can call them “The Paper Plate”, just get to using them!

  1. B2B Lead warming outreach
    • If in an email, start with a thank you and deeper introduction.  This needs to come from a human being in your organization (even in automated marketing process).  Explain what inspired your company to provide the said content.  “Our mission is to solve X problem for companies like yours.  Here’s some other information you might like….” Offer them to connect socially.  DO NOT send them to your generic company branded social channels.  Ask them to connect with YOU, human being, through your LinkedIn profile.  After LinkedIn individual connection, feel free to send the other social links to corporate accounts.  This lead does not care about your 586 cat videos and this ain’t that kind of party.
    • If the lead warming is a phone call, your only goal is to warm the relationship.  DO NOT try and sell of offer anything.  This is a thank you call and a little about why you do what you do.  If your call gets returned or you follow a voicemail with an email you *might* go as far as asking for 10 minutes for feedback on downloaded content purely for market research purposes.  If the rapport is instant, I leave it in your capable hands to decide how far to go.  Stranger things have happened than the purple unicorn that is a sale on lead warming calls.
  2. B2B lead Value outreach #1
    • Hey, I just met you..and this is crazy.  But, here’s something else for free…so call me, maybe?
    • This should be email drip #2, it is about them, not you.  If you are already tapped for content you think they might want..recycle!  Turn those words into multimedia (Infographics, PowerPoint slides, Video) with one point from the content expanded or boiled down.
  3. B2B lead Value outreach #2
    • Based on how good your marketing automation is, this step can go down in a few different ways.  Preferably, I already know what you’ve clicked on in previous outreach and if you happened to visit other pages or content on your journey.  The best option is to trigger segmentation based on those habits.  Joe clicks on content then repeatedly goes to your careers page – Joe wants a job, he’s not a potential client.  However, David and Sally click on content, about us and services – they get segmented in to value outreach that gives them more reason to cut out all this flirting and get a proposal from your company.  If the rest of the list didn’t click anything, send them on through this cycle – then rinse and repeat until the timing is right.  On the other hand, you have a competitor sneaking into your gated content, kick that impostor to your own brand of “no more communicado” list and stop training them.
    • It’s going to take a little data science and evaluation on your part to plan these value outreach steps in  meaningful way.  Based on actions, you should know what kind of value your (now segmented) prospects will really appreciate.
  4. B2B lead warming:  The non-paid Offer
    • This step is very important and requires you to really know your list and habits by now.  Should you offer a free 30-minute consultation on X problem?  Maybe a mini-analysis so you can demonstrate future value?  Possibly, it’s just a chance to attend a webinar that’s invitation only.
    • Be strategic, make it count.
  5. The ASK, B2B lead warming’s final step
    • Finally, you say, we can sell something!  Maybe, maybe not.  If you haven’t had any chance to actually talk to this live person yet – you are not selling in the ASK, you are still qualifying.  In my 20 years of B2B sales, the more delayed the sale – the easier the close.  Anticipation makes the heart grow fonder, but I digress.
    • Your ASK goal is to have a reason they will talk to you.  You’ve given them lots of great stuff by now.  You may ask for 20 minutes to get their opinion on X industry or, for market research, like to know what are the top 5 challenges their business faces in light of X market shift.
    • Your ASK is telling them that their brain is valuable to you.

 

If at any time during this process, you get an email, clickstream, phone call or smoke signal that indicates true sales potential, by all means, call THEM.  Set an appointment and put them in the pipeline.  If you do all of this, and still not seeing response…then, honey, the dog didn’t like the dog food.  Suck up your pride and find out where you lost interest.

 

I hope this is helpful to developing your B2B lead process.  It’s very time consuming, but pays in spades for brand perception and top of mind awareness.  When you get really good at these B2B lead warming steps, you’ll be able to predict income from the first point of contact.

 

Radical Strategy

In the world of strategy, there are two camps.  One who play it safe and look for incremental improvement.  And the other who rebukes status quo, and is not afraid to “break the system”.

It’s no secret that I’m part of the radical strategy crew.  If the same effort can be applied and the results are drastically different…why even bother with lukewarm benefits?

Radical Strategy employs these rules:

  1. It breaks the system.  
    • Breaking has a negative connotation, in some views.  But breaking a system ignores fear of competition.  If Zuckerburg were afraid of MySpace…well, you know.  Competition is an advantage in breaking the system.  You can be first, or you can be best.  Let the first guy bear the problems, perfect the issues and provide something better.
  2. Hyper-Responsive becomes the new snooze.
    • Responding to trends is the ol’ standard.  I see it, now I’ll apply it.  In radical strategy, predictions become as germane as reading the daily news.  If someone else is doing it, you are too late my friend.  Predicting the problems of your customers is the super highway to radical strategy.
  3. Failure is it’s fuel.
    • Most strategy is designed to mitigate risk, no failure roadmaps.  That’s a pretty childish approach, IMO.  Failing fast is invaluable knowledge.  If moving fast (see above rule), failure becomes market intelligence, allows for strategic predictions and reevaluates the customers needs by ruling out those tactics.
  4. Collaborate or Die.
    • The mad-scientist/genius approach is a thing of the past.  The brain trust in this modern world means ideas and perspective of a collaborative environment far surpass the “hero” needs of yesterday.  Radical strategy re-imagines competition as collaborators, finds value in the ideas of every team position and looks to unrelated industries for unique partnerships.
  5. Kill the cow.
    • Radical strategy isn’t afraid to compete against itself.  The standard sales in a company becomes competition.  The next generation of greatness does not come from the last decade of sales. (See prediction point #2).  Killing the cow calls for solving customer problems in other categories.  And solving problems is the lifeblood of radical growth.

I challenge you to investigate radical strategy.  Hey, you can plot it and not even take action if fear is your motivator.  That’s your safety net. (^^,)

 

It’s the 4th quarter..I invite you to kick ass. Let me know what your radical is jennifer@jenniferbarbee.com.  Or drop me a line if, you know, you need a radical strategists opinion.

Jenn

Have we forgotten how to tell a story?

I don’t know about you, but I became obsessed with the Netflix original series, “Stranger Things”.  This phenomenon took me right back to middle school and every Steven Spielberg movie I have ever seen.  Upon reading about the young writers who created the series, I happened upon this Spielberg quote that inspired them to write about the 80s, set in the 80s.

People have forgotten how to tell a story. Stories don’t have a middle or an end any more. They usually have a beginning that never stops beginning.
~Steven Spielberg

This made me think of a few things, one of which is our society tends to only celebrate beginnings.  “Oh, you’ve started law school!”  “You are writing a book!”  “You have this new product!”  In good ol’ fashion American Dream-esque pride, the beginning of something is lauded.  But, are we doing a disservice to our brands by not telling a middle and an end?

Doesn’t a great story deserve to be fully revealed?

We may think telling a brand story about the end means an exit strategy.  Not necessarily. And, though we may not know the end of our brand story, don’t we have goals for it?  Isn’t that an ending of sorts?  Can’t we at least develop a middle that keeps brand ambassadors engaged in lieu of a shotgun approach of .. “hey, look at this new thing!”?

I don’t have a specific answer that will fit all brands, but I do know that good stories need to be well told.

Think about our communication as a screen play.  Who are the characters, what genre is it, what kind of people engage in this type of entertainment?  Fully develop these story-lines, if even in your mind, and give your brand the life it deserves.

Are you posting in social media just to get your count up, to sell, to get in on viral trends?  How does that really serve the story of your brand?  Let’s say you’re a tourism marketing organization and adventure travelers are a prime target audience. Share stories (think drip story telling, not one blog post) about other adventurers.  How did they hear about you?  What struggles did they have to overcome?  What was the lasting story that stuck with them?

Draw your listeners in and pretend this is your show….now howya’ going to get those ratings up? (^^,)

 

 

Why I quit Services for Strategy.

So, when I started out in this big, bold world of marketing and digital, I focused on the tactics, the services.  I wanted to relieve the burden of my client.  The “I’ll take care of that for you!” girl.  It was awesome.  In the early days of digital marketing, websites and marketing, clients were convinced all this “web stuff” was magic.  And me, a magician.  The more clients I had, the larger the economies of scale, the broader my talent grew.  Over the years I grew a wide repertoire in the space.  I gained invaluable tools that allowed me good judgement for clients’ tactical needs.  I experimented, I developed Best Practices.  I grew.  I made mistakes.  The saying is true:

Good judgement comes from experience.  And, experience, that mostly comes from bad judgement.

Having been blessed to work with great companies that afforded me multi-level work with lots of clients, patterns emerged.  Not just the tactical patterns, strategic observations.  Then, self-serve services came to pass.  I gravitated towards speaking about this time, and did less “doing the what” and inspiring the “why”.  It was advantageous for me, personally, because I had done the “what”, my advice carried a authenticity to it that few other competitors could relate.  More and more, my role became the strategist, the chick that pointed a program in the direction of unique, albeit, predictable success.  I wanted a pure strategy company, a think tank.  The problem?  As I peddled strategy, the clients still wanted the work done for them.  That’s cool, I can do that blindfolded.  And, hey it’s their money.  For 8 years I ran my own services company.  A cracker-jack team of smart marketers, we saw explosive success.  I still yearned for the pure strategy position.  It was a hard sale.  Though, there was no shortage of good business, I was a boutique firm, and lacked the impressive staff numbers to sell strategy to the “vanity” clients.

Eventually, I closed my service business and said goodbye to the staff who had become family.  It’s gratifying to watch how their careers have taken wings, and I hope that in some small part, I was a part of that trajectory.  Flying solo, and digging deeper into what “strategy” meant, I realized I was not alone.  All of a sudden, everyone was a strategist, a guru, a maven.  Relentless in my pursuit to be the stand out, I’ve come to know there are a handful of important habits the really incredible strategist does.  When cultivating these, I felt I had read my palm, my destiny stared back at me with glaring apparence.

Great Strategy  makes you care.

Motivation is like bathing, it’s a habit.  Whatever the goal might be, great strategy makes you want to do more than ‘keep your job”.  I’ve always said, “Every cause needs a rebel”.  Good strategy turns goals into causes.  It permeates the organization from top-down, bottom-to-top.  This thing, it gets a hold of you and becomes part of your DNA until accomplished.  Great strategy doesn’t just identify the prescription, it creates the drug that propels you to do the thing at all costs.  Check out my post on motivation.

Great Strategy breaks the system.

If you are playing catch up with the competition, why not imagine something better?  It takes the same effort, the same resources to leapfrog past status quo and “break the system” to create a wholly new thing to exceed goals.  Great strategists don’t see roadblocks, they know that resourcefulness is the best resource, and they partner with you to become the insurgent brand that gets you there. They don’t reinvent the wheel, that bores them.  They create self-driving cars.

Great Strategy digs in.

So many strategists “should” all over a client.  Creating fancy PowerPoints and leaving  you scratching your head is the hallmark of the average, IMO.  Great strategists are great partners and coaches.  They’ve lived in the tactical, and they know exactly what has to be performed.  If they haven’t done it, how will you?  Great strategists identify and remove roadblocks, inspire action and see it through. When I create strategy for a client, I’m their “ride or die” girl.  What needs to be done, will be done.

Great Strategy is difficult to copy.

Imitation might be the sincerest form of flattery.  Great strategy should be so groundbreaking that it’s near impossible to duplicate.  The problem with using a “campaign idea” as strategy is that’s only advertising.  It’s cheap, replicatable and end the end, drains your pocketbook with placement battles.  Don’t outspend your competition, outsmart them.  Campaigns aren’t strategy, they are vehicles.  That is not a big idea, that’s lazy.

 

I still do the tactical thing, when called for, but there’s a new feeling associated with it.  It’s inspired action instead of checking off boxes and time sheets.  Being a strategist is a noble profession for me.  It challenges my best and uses my “failures” as fuel.

I hope sharing my story has inspired you to recognize great strategy, and if you are unclear about yours…you know where I am. (^^,)